Premiere: Love Bailey’s Insane “Hollywood Hooker”

Premiere: Love Bailey’s Insane “Hollywood Hooker”

Revel in the cultural visionary's newest visual.



Revel in the cultural visionary's newest visual.

Text: MATHIAS ROSENZWEIG

People have called Love Bailey a “cultural visionary”, which is perhaps the best way to summarize someone making such a diverse and powerful impact. She is, of course, a visual artist, a musician, a performer, a designer—truly any form of creativity you can image, Bailey has explored it as a vessel. But unlike most creatives that share a similar range of interests, she’s been consistent in making high caliber work across the board, regardless of how it manifests.

Bailey’s deep roots in the queer community have intrinsically made said art political. She spends her weekends at the Savage Ranch, which has become a safe haven for other queer artists from across the globe. The result has been a Warhol-esque factory that churns out videos featuring Bailey and her ever-growing cast of friends and collaborators. As a celebration of Pride Month, V is lucky enough to premiere Bailey’s new music video for her song “Hollywood Hooker.” It feels like a sort of visual cocaine, darting in and out of scenes depicting dark, often eerie glamour. The video depicts the highly stylized, playful but sexy gay club of your dreams, complete with glittery cowboy hats, burlesque vibes and enough color to make Toucan Sam feel jealous.

We also got a chance to speak with Bailey about her other film Slather, the increasingly iconic ranch, and what she has for us down the line.

Can you tell me a little bit about the song itself and how it came about?

So the song is a collaboration between my friend Edward Vigiletti & Bebe Huxley. Edward Vigiletti made the beat and B.B. and I worked on the audio. When I wrote these lyrics, it was at the time when the political climate was happening with Trump and the pipelines were going on, And Trump saying that he’s going to grab women by the pussy or that Trans woman are a burden to society. This is my response to fragile masculinity saying “Transphobia take a seat, if you fuck with me i’ll chop off your meat!”

It seems that when the political or social climate is in turmoil, a lot of great art comes out of it.

I would agree, I work in Hollywood, and the Harvey Weinstein #metoo thing was a whole huge scandal that happened, and lets not forget about Heidi Fleiss, the Hollywood Madame, well she was my mother's ex. And she sort of terrorized my life on the ranch. I live on this ranch and had to reclaim that land from her after several extortion attempts. I’ve had to fight for the woman I want to become & this video documents the fury & rage i had from that experience.

Can you tell me more about the ranch and its background more?

The ranch is now a safe haven for queers and we host gatherings and we’re having a music festival coming up. We do harvest festivals and it’s just a safe space for my chosen fam. It came to me because my mother had an animal rescue in Temecula, California and it’s located in the wine country on the top of a big hill. So there’s no obstruction of views—it’s a 360 degree view of nature. It’s a beautiful place but her ex lover, from prison, Heidi Fleiss, came into the picture. My mother has a soft spot for taking care of animal and people, and Heidi came back into the picture saying she needed to come off meds and she needed help taking care of her birds. So she moved into the property with her animals and she terrorized this house and told police officers that she paid cash for the property. She was going through this extortion battle with us and we had to prove that this land was actually ours and we had to go through a year or two in court battles with her. We finally got her evicted and now this place is a refuge; a safe place, and a place that I express my freedom.

Is it where you live full time? Or do you just go down sometimes?

I live here on the weekends and I go back to the city for work in LA. I’m a working girl ;)

I’m curious about your background in the creative industry and if music is somewhat of a new shift or focus in a way.

So as a little child, I’d crawl into my mother’s base drum. She was a musician in the 70’s. She was in a rock band and I’d crawl in her base drum with padded lining and fall asleep. So rhythm and the music and the beat is what drives me. Sometimes I can even have social anxiety being out in public, and that’s a way for me to connect with people—dancing on the dance floor and letting my hair down, and connecting with my vessel, my body. I’m not a trained musician. I don’t have any aspirations to become something that I’m not, a pop star, but I am a fluid artist. Anything that I put my name on, I give it my all and I give it my soul. I have a lot to say and that’s what I wanted to do with this song, is sort of reclaim my truths and speak my mind.

Can you talk about putting together the video? If you’re writing a song for example, do you have visual elements in mind while you’re writing it or does it come completely after the fact?

Being here on this land shapes a lot of the visual imagery that I create. Right before this, I did Violet Chachki’s “A Lot More Me”, and there were a few creative constraints for that. You know, when you’re creating a visual for someone else, they have a particular thing in mind and you sort of make their fantasy happen, and this was a different fantasy than I had. After, I worked with Grindr. They came on my ranch and shot an editorial. I found my image on thousands of billboards all across America, even in Times Square, and they didn’t have me sign anything. It was sort of queer exploitation happening on my land, on my own property. I went after them for what was owed to me and that check that they signed over is what paid for “Hollywood Hooker” to happen. I employed all of my favorite queer friends to come over to the ranch. I fed them, I cooked for them, and for about a month straight we worked on this project, and the queer fam built those staircases that you see me walking down. It takes a village.

That’s kind of amazing. It’s a really good use of the money in the end.

Yeah, I mean I don’t want to horde all the coins. Everything I make really goes back into these films because these films bring people together. Even when I do screenings, it’s a way for us to come back together. I like seeing the evolution of these films and what it does for our community, that’s sort of my purpose.

Why do you think our community, the queer community, tends to be so creative? Or maybe you don’t even agree with that.

Anywhere where there is repression and oppression, when you’re ostracized from something, you have no choice. It’s survival. It’s battling against society, and expressing yourself. Society tends to put a choke hold on our truth because for whatever reason it makes them uncomfortable. This is how we choose to express ourselves, and if we don’t express ourselves, we harvest our thoughts and succumb to our alter ego that says we’re not worthy or not valuable, or we’ll never make it because we’re a joke. These are the thoughts that society teaches us, and if we don’t express ourselves, we self-implode. Maybe that’s why.

Can you talk about what other projects you have coming up whether they’re your own or you’re working with other people on a collaboration?

Yeah. The film that I created about two years ago when the Heidi Fleiss thing was happening, when I was homeless living in a garage, I created that as survival. We’re talking therapy. This was my therapy while I was going through a dark time. That’s what Violet Chachki saw at Soho House in New York. That was when she called me afterwards and said, “I want the Slather film but I want a lot less you and a lot more me.” And that was what birthed her film. Michael Patrick King saw that—he produced Sex in the City—and he called me into his office and was like, I have to know who did this, how you did this, and who you are. It brought me to his office and he’s hired me to work on project for him. I can’t talk about that series, it’s all under contract but we’re going to be working on it together at Warner Brothers Studio lot, and I will be employing all of my queer friends.

That’s one thing we’re working on, and next is on July 7th, we’re going to be performing at the Belasco. We’re going to be showcasing "Hollywood Hooker” and Bebe Huxley and Saturn Rising, and Dominique Echeverria, Charlie Le Mindu, The Kissboyz, Miss Tosh, Madam Jeuge, Andres Rigal  is going to be there and it’s going to be sort of our Slather Cabaret at the Belasco Theater. Then, film-wise, I’m working on a special project with Jodie Harsh and I’m working on Sussi’s next film. Now I have a fucking agent, thank god. Won’t be dealing with people like Grindr that will try fuck me over.  Life is good. We’re just going to continue with making films and these screenings that bring people together to make this magical rainbow fantasy a reality.

It sounds like a lot is happening pretty quickly also, that you’re keeping up with everything it would seem.

I have no choice. You know, failure is not an option.

Credits: Cinematography by Jordan Millington & Corey Parsons Drone shots by Vasilios Papapitsios Produced by Slather Studios: Mark Cramer, Sussi, Bebe Huxley Edited by Parish Cherry & Vasilios Papapitsios Shot on the Savage Ranch Sets by Miles Gracey Art Dept Suja Ono Art Dept assistant Megan Morales Creative Direction Love Bailey & Sussi Catering by Kento Tachibani Choreography: The Kissboyz Wardrobe assist: Melvin Styles Designers: Daniel Vi Lie, Giles Asquin, Seth Pratt, Bcalla, Maison the Faux, Makeup: Pat Mcgrath Hair: Necia’s Hairstyling Slatherists (in order of appearance) Sussi The Kiss Boyz: Julio Marcelino, Johnny Rice, Anthony Garza Yasmin Petty Ves Phillippi Frosty Bebe Huxley Jeff Thomas Kelby Adam Kento Tachibani Melvin Styles Aram Giragos Cameron J. Rose Allanah Star Vigiletti - Skarlet feat. Love Bailey (Hollywood Hooker Remix) Produced by: Edward Vigiletti & Justin Bates, Written by Love & Bebe Huxley *special thanks to Manko Cabaret *This Video was made possible by a diverse family of queers on the Savage Ranch

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